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Home Improvement

Found 24 blog entries about Home Improvement.

As it relates to Costa Mesa residential properties, the “location, location, location” homily is usually thought of as referring to neighborhoods. Homes in superior Costa Mesa neighborhoods are visibly well cared for, usually have larger footprints, appealing architecture, etc. Their higher resale values are self-sustaining because their buyers can afford attentive maintenance.

But the locationX3 adage can also be valid for how a property is sited. Costa Mesa listings that read like absolute steals online can sometimes prove the point (one that remote buyers without local representation can learn to regret).

A fabulous home situated in the wrong place can be a mistake waiting to happen.
Examples:

  1. An otherwise exceptional Costa Mesa home
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The U.S. News & World Report weighed in last week with a quite useful list: housewarming gift ideas that are both thoughtful and practical. The entire list ran to 15 entries—some less appropriate than others (right now, the “hummingbird feeder” might be more appreciated come springtime)—but for most Costa Mesa readers, on the whole, it presented a very useful compendium.

It spurred a wider search for other lists that have appeared in recent years. Here, in addition to some of the U.S. News ideas, are ten good ones:

  1. Customized return address stamp or stickers.
  2. Personalized doormat.
  3. A choice item from a favorite local Costa Mesa business.
  4. Cooking herb planter.
  5. Step stool.
  6. Keyholder (a tray, bowl, or set of hooks).
  7. Personalized
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One pandemic side-effect affecting Costa Mesa residential properties got Wall Street’s attention last week. The second-quarter sales numbers were scheduled for release, and the home improvement industry was expecting strong results. Sure enough, come Tuesday, Home Depot weighed in with what MarketWatch hailed as “stellar business performance”—domestic sales growth of 25%.

The following morning, Lowe’s announced “very strong” second-quarter results. They weren’t kidding. With “sales for the home improvement business increasing 35.1%,” modesty would have been inappropriate.

In fact, the big-box giants’ record-breaking flood of commerce reflects the circumstances many Costa Mesa homeowners have been dealing with themselves. Because of the

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They’re yet to become a major presence in the mainstream of housing technology, but that could be in for a change. Increasingly, advances in “clean” technology—innovations aimed at sanitizing household living spaces—seem likely to become commonplace in the coming years.

Along with many other accommodations spawned by the coronavirus pandemic, Costa Mesa homeowners have grown much more conscious of the presence of germs of all kinds on household surfaces. That’s sent many on a mission to eradicate them as much as practical—a frustrating campaign, since the targets are, for all practical purposes, invisible.

Last week, CNBC reported on a number of technological developments that innovative-minded Costa Mesa contractors and Costa Mesa

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Last week there came this snippet from a radio commentary: “No matter how business is doing, the landlord business is doing just fine.”

Especially in the context of last week’s nerve-rattling tumult on Wall Street, that remark seemed particularly relevant—especially for investors newly motivated to investigate the upside of Costa Mesa residential investments.

There is one national statistic that unambiguously points in a positive direction—one that current landlords from coast to coast should find comforting. The indicator in question is the Moving Rate—and it’s signaling stability.

In the common vocabulary of commercial business, the Moving Rate describes the “customer base” for the “product” that residential investors produce. It is the

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The importance of “curb appeal” as a factor for selling Costa Mesa homes has never been questioned. It’s as important as packaging is to breakfast cereal makers—or to any manufacturer whose products compete for shelf space in a supermarket. “Curb appeal” produces a potential homebuyer’s first impression—and that has a way of influencing a lot of what follows.

Yet just exactly the degree to which curb appeal determines any Costa Mesa home’s sales success is—like most of the other factors that go into the art of selling—not something that you’d think would lend itself to scientific study.

Not so, as the slogan on the masthead of the Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics proclaims. The editors of that periodical take an opposing view:

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According to Alina Dizik, one of the leading Wall Street Journal’s real estate commentators, a growing number of luxury homeowners are finding new appreciation for an old idea. In fact, the older, the better. 

Pursuing a way to enhance the feel of modern homes, more and more homeowners are “getting into the groove” of reclaiming ancient materials—especially old wood. Antique timbers from old New England barn sidings have long been recycled, but usually only for walls. Now other uses are being found to add character to otherwise unexceptional rooms.

For Costa Mesa homeowners looking to update their own homes, looking to the past might be an idea worth thinking about.

The Journal highlights a successful example in a Minnesota couple who

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Arial Shot of Neighborhood 

 

Every serious house hunter is aware that the Costa Mesa neighborhood surrounding any house has a significant effect on its ultimate value. It follows that the future of a neighborhood will have a measurable impact the future value of the properties in it.

Part of the reason not much emphasis is given to this factor is the difficulty of gauging a neighborhood’s future prospects. That’s especially true for homebuyers who are new to the area. Yet there are ways to scrutinize neighborhood characteristics for indications that augur well…or which point to a future which might not be headed in the right direction.

Here are four such factors:

  1.       Incomes. Strong average household incomes are indicative of more than just the current
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As soon as you begin to plan to sell your Costa Mesa home, you’ll soon find one thing everyone agrees upon: the need to de-clutter. But where to start? For any home that’s been lived in for years, it’s easier said than done. Most of us shrink from even thinking about what goes and what stays. But one way to wade into the project is to force the issue by picking a date and (now that you’re committed)—holding a garage (AKA ‘yard’) sale!

For garage sale neophytes, there are a number of tips that veterans agree upon.

 

Here are six that top most lists:

  •          Inventory as if you are serious. That means making a list of each of the major items you will be offering, then placing a price tag on each. A very general rule of thumb is to
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The numbers are in!

If you are among the local homeowners counting the days until Costa Mesa’s hot selling season begins, unless your house is already in perfect showing shape, you might be pondering which—if any—possible remodeling projects would be wise to take on before you list.

The answers aren’t simple. The first consideration is the calculation for whether your property is likely to attract top dollar in its as-is condition. If not, you need a prospect’s-eye take on which areas are most likely to detract from the apparent overall value of the property. Then comes another factor: identifying which of those projects will go furthest in recapturing their cost.

Even if leaving everything as-is doesn’t inspire much confidence, it might

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